Monday, August 22, 2016

Failure Cancelled For The Day



I'm really tired of failing, and I think it's time to stop doing that. So I'm setting some non-failure-no-that's-not-happening goals for today. On this day I will not fail. I will succeed. 


  • I will write three amazing sentences. (low expectations also helps)
  • I will finish reading the two books I'm into and loving.
  • I will cook an "Ahh Factor" dinner that even I can say, "Oh, my!" when I take that first bite.
  • I will take a walk in the woods and Bill Bryson will envy me.

For one day I will not fail.  Yay!

I've learned that failing and getting up and moving ahead means I'm stronger than I ever imagined. I'm only here for a short time, so while I'm here I want to succeed. I know I'll have more failure along the way in the future. Just not today. Today Failure's cancelled.



So much for philosophy 101 and on to Monday-Morphing-into-Goddess-Writer Person.




I made a huge decision yesterday--huge, in like I said, "Okay, fish or cut bait, Lee." And I actually started to write book three of the Alligators Overhead and The Great Time Lock Disaster series. So I'm into research and. . . are you ready? I'm learning new things. 



Did you know that the name, Plantagenet, came from planta genista, the Latin for yellow broom flower, which the Counts of Anjou wore as an emblem on their helmets? Hillary probably knows this, but until yesterday I didn't. I just pull it out of my garden every chance I get. Terrible stuff.

And did you know that Richard the Lion Heart was the first king to be a knight?



And did you know that he and his family spoke French and not English, although they were the rulers of England? 

I'm so jazzed about all of this and the possibilities for Pete and Weasel and book three.



Hope you'll visit Literary Rambles today. The Dragons and I are paying a visit to that wonderful blog.



My Quote of the Week: "The world is full of magic things, patiently waiting for our senses to grow sharper." W.B. Yeats











84 comments:

  1. Bill Bryson will envy you!
    That the family spoke French and not English is ironic.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And they seldom even bothered to be in England. An odd way to rule a country.

      Delete
  2. Great goals. I have every confidence you'll achieve them :-)

    Our kings didn't speak English for a very long time, actually. Henry IV was the first native speaking King - but later than that, George I and II both only spoke German. (I was curious, so I looked it up :-) )

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is really interesting. I wonder how the U.S. would do with a president who didn't speak English?

      Delete
  3. I try to look at failure as not really failing at something but learning how NOT to do something. I like your goals. I guess I'd probably get lost in research and forget what I was supposed to be doing. It sounds fascinating. Good luck. :-)

    Thoughts in Progress
    and MC Book Tours

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, getting lost in research is a danger. I love finding out all of the interesting history so much.

      Delete
  4. I like your attitude! Following your example, I WILL finish a new chapter today.

    I did know that the English royal court spoke French. The English language was thought to be "common."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah, the good old days when English was a language for the serfs. Here's to finishing that chapter.

      Delete
  5. I love learning new things doing research as well!
    Can't wait to see what Pete & Weasel get up to next!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm in the same boat. I have a sense there may be a joust involved if I can figure out how to do that. Oh, and moats! I love the idea of moats, but I know I wouldn't like the reality of them. Quite murky.

      Delete
  6. You have a great attitude and idea. I may borrow it.
    Yay for the third book in the series. What will the boys be up to next? Or should we say what will the author be up to next?
    Research is so much fun.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The best part is setting out on the journey, isn't it? So many possibilities.

      Delete
  7. Country was back then pretty much ruled by Normans, methink, thus the French :) Them two were so interconnected in the past for centuries just like my people with the Turks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I often wonder how these countries would fair without all the nationalism today? Maybe the EU would work better. Who know?

      Delete
  8. I loved this. Every day we should plan to succeed. It can be hard, especially when we get setbacks, but we can vow to not let that get us down and not let failure win by continuing to move forward. Great lesson and motivational push!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I might have to hit replay on this one! :-) Thanks, Chrys.

      Delete
  9. Good goals. Good luck achieving them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Especially those amazing sentences. Still haven't done those.

      Delete
  10. An English ruling French speaking Knight King? Sounds legit. Success can be found in many ways. Failure is just hanging in the shadows waiting to pounce. Focus on repeated attempts to improve more than just straight up failure. We need to learn things and even when we do mistakes can still be made. As all humans do. Best of luck writing book 3 Lee and I wish many more successes and repeated attempts in your life.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'd better speed up, Sheena-kay. I'm running out of time here. :-)

      Delete
  11. I'm not surprised by the French thing. Norman conquest and all. Which is why the critters have English names but the food that comes from them is French. (Why the critter is a chicken but we eat poultry.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. An interesting linguistic trail to explore.

      Delete
  12. Great post and sentiments behind it. NO FAILURES TODAY.
    Yvonne.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Wonderful goals. I fail often, but the only one which is irreversible is to give up. I am more stubborn than stains so haven't. Yet.
    History was so badly taught wasn't it? If they had given us little gems like the King of England not speaking English I suspect my history bug would have started much earlier.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know what you're saying. I just remember long lists of names with words like Plantagenets included along with dates. Who cared?

      Delete
  14. Hi Lee - thanks for the link up. I did know ... but was glad to see you'd highlighted Plantagenet today ... as I saw some on my way back down the motorway yesterday!

    Failing offers us opportunities ... I'm learning that - one's life can change ... so good for you - lots of new horizons ahead.

    I think I'd better do a post on how the English language came about ... I started with my post on "Scandinavian Words" - after I'd visited the Viking exhibition at the British Museum ... and I know I've written other pieces too ... perhaps I need to collate them at some stage. In my post above - there are links to various sites - given by the Professor who gave the talk ...

    I agree with EC - I've learnt so much since I started blogging - particularly history ... with its related subjects ...

    Good luck with those books and your output - cheers Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'd love it if you'd pull together the Indo-European language threads. To me, there's nothing more interesting than languages and culture.

      Delete
  15. I didn’t know about planta genista, but there is a faint stirring in my brain re Richard the Lion Heart and French. I must have learnt about it at school, and it is still there somewhere just buried very deep.
    You don’t fail at anything Lee. You are just in the processes of mastering it. Now repeat that three times… ;-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, Ma'am. I'm doing that now. And thank you for that.


      Delete
  16. How can you consider yourself a failure when you have so many wonderful books out there in the world? I did not know that Plantagenet came from the broom flower. I think I knew about their speaking French, though.

    I wish I were a better cook... but I didn't seem to get that particular gene which runs strong among the women on both sides of my family.

    I may just take a walk in the woods by our house (we call it the 100 Acre Woods a group of oaks that have miraculously survive the devastating oak wilt that's killed off all the trees in the surrounding area.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm having one of those "What will I do if . . ." weeks, Bish. I have them every once in a while. Take pictures of that walk. I'd love to see those oaks.

      Still raining where you are?

      Delete
  17. Hi, Lee!

    I called you Lee instead of C. Lee this time because you called yourself Lee. Let me know if that is how you wish to be addressed (or if you prefer Goddess-Writer Person) :)

    I totally agree that you can make success a habit by setting smaller, modest goals, achieving them, crossing them off your list and acknowledging and thanking yourself for meeting those challenges. Like any other habit the success habit is self-perpetuating and leads to greater accomplishments.

    Research is a fantastic way to learn all kinds of new things. It's fun to set aside a block of time and go wherever your research threads lead. It boggles the mind to go off on dozens of tangents as you conduct research on one specific topic, but it is great fun and a wonderful learning experience.

    Happy Tuesday, dear friend Lee!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love that you call me Lee. That means you know me better than when we first met and we're now blogging "friends." I also love that you take the time to reply to my posts. Stick with me, Shady Del Knight! I like you.

      Delete
  18. Making small achievable objectives is the best way to ensure success.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Nana,

      Yes breaking it down into manageable chunks is often the best practice.

      Delete
  19. That is the way to be. Who cares if one fails, as long as you get back up and try again.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's what cats do, right? I should have talked to the cat when I was writing this post. Next time. :-)

      Delete
  20. Yeah, book 3, looking forward to it. No I did not know any of that, lol. Love the quote.
    Juneta @ Writer's Gambit

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, come by and give me a shove every so often! I'll need it to finish this thing.

      Delete
  21. What a great attitude, Lee. And great that you are taking actions too. Me too. I really feel like I am moving through all my challenges of the last few years into a new me that is feeling good.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm so glad to hear you're turning that corner, Natalie. I know it has been a rough time.

      Delete
  22. Love your attitude. And I'm intrigued by the book title, The Great Timelock Disaster. The cover really pulls me in.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like that book more than I like Alligators Overhead, but they do go together.

      Delete
  23. Replies
    1. That's such a sweet thing to say. Thanks so much.

      Delete
  24. Yay for a third book in your series and for learning new things! I had no idea about Plantagenet or the King/Knight. I'm researching a new book too, but having trouble finding info about European miners in the 1600-1700s. I guess I'll have to make it up... I'm trying to follow that "Success" signpost, but that distant "Success" mountain never seems to get any closer no matter how far I walk, and I'm usually left with only a sunburnt nose and sore feet for my troubles.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm insane for doing this third book. MG is a no-win place to be without a big publisher, and I'm just not interested in seeking that out. Someone shoot me!

      Delete
  25. I believe in celebrating the little things, and I think that stems from not wanting to fail.

    Good luck with book three!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. All those little things add up to some very big ones.

      Delete
  26. Let us know how it went!

    All I want to do today is find a name for the fictional place I've been writing about. It's taking way too long to do this.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Setting achievable goals is a win for avoiding failure.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Actually, I did know that Richard Lionheart spoke French. He had great contempt for the English. He was also gay and quite in love with Louis of France. He's an enigmatic figure in history.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think English was below just about everyone who had a castle. What if those guys could see us now?

      He and Louis might have made quite a cute couple and struck a blow against homophobia early on. Darn. A missed opportunity. Love that Ricard was off being a super Christian in the Crusades most of his life.

      Delete
  29. I love Bill Bryson's A Walk in the Woods. I've read it twice. I need to get out more often.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love all his books. I don't think I've laughed as hard at anything as I do at Notes From a Small Island.

      Delete
  30. Hi, Lee...

    I agree with Bish.... How could you be a failure with so many hit books... You should be SO PROUD of yourself and excited about your next!

    One is NEVER a failure if they still wish to learn and judging by the enthusiasm of your research, you still get jazzed up about learning new things. NEVER LOSE THAT!

    Enjoy your research!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Michael and thanks for the pep talk. You're a wonder when it comes to shoring people up with your words.

      Delete
  31. So not sure how you think this is a failure?? You may feel you didn't do much but you way of thinking and confronting this sense of "failure" just shows the exact opposite.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hadn't thought of that. Thanks, Brigit. This is why I love this community. They open up new ways of looking at things for me.

      Delete
  32. I love your positive reaffirmation. Go, Lee, go! You're totally going to kill it. =)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, Crystal, it's either that or the other way around. :-)

      Delete
  33. I love all the directions my plot goes when I research. The world has so many fascinating bits of info that I want to blend into my plot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love finding nuggets from the past to tuck into a story. Glad you like to research as well.

      Delete
  34. You're no failure in my book, Lee:) In fact, you're an inspiration:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's sweet, Mark. Thanks so much. See you Saturday.

      Delete
  35. Just remember, Bill Bryson was a failure as an Appalachian Trail hiker (said from someone who has hiked the entire thing and got a patch to prove it!) But his book is funny.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're right. He didn't make, did he! But you did. Now when's your book coming out. I'd love to read about your experiences.

      Delete
  36. The more books you have out there to buy, the better things will be when your career does take off. Failure is in the eye of the beholder, and you're obviously not giving into it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm learning that having those books out there makes for one hell of a lot of work, so I'm trying to figure a way to manage all of it. No. Not giving in. Just doing a little reassessment.

      Delete
  37. Hey superstar author, Lee,

    Your positive affirmations are overwhelming proof that failure isn't really happening. It's more about the learning experience.

    I have no idea what I'm talking about. Then again, I'm so wrapped up in a certain situation that I can barely formulate a decent sentence.

    Of course, other than that, I'm still your starstuckest fan!

    Gary :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course, I know you're right. If you're not falling down once in a while, you're not trying new things. Take care. The situation will vanish, just not in the way you expect or fast enough to be reasonable.

      Delete
  38. ... and Bill Bryson will envy you...
    *rolls with laughter*
    Nice one.

    ReplyDelete
  39. You inspire me. That is far from being a failure. And I like you even more with that Bill Bryson comment! My hubby and I have all his books. One day I'd love to walk the Appalachian Trail... or at least a little of it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A Bryson fan! No wonder I like you. Here's to taking that hike, Christine.

      Delete
  40. I love the no failure attitude and your list seems great! :)

    I am SO excited there will be a third book in the series. Yeah! Can't wait to read it. Happy writing!
    ~Jess

    ReplyDelete
  41. Happy writing. I've felt like a failure most of the week, so I'm getting things done today. I know I'll go in that cycle again, but that's okay.

    ReplyDelete
  42. Love your attitude, C.Lee!!!
    And, I actually knew the part about French-speaking English Kings . . . because Shakespeare made English cool for the first time in the late 1500s and early 1600s. Before that, all the rulers thought French was more "posh" and happening, and English was considered a vulgar language. Shakespeare put our language on the map. :)

    ReplyDelete
  43. I told failure I had cancelled its appointment for the day. Failure just laughed. I then redefined success as surviving failure's visit! Wish you luck in the research. Did you know that Richard the Lionhearted own heart was housed in the Rouen Cathedral in France? His bowels are housed in another cathedral -- who would want his bowels anyway? :-)

    ReplyDelete
  44. I made a goal of editing 100 pages today and I'm at 90 now! Still time to go.

    ReplyDelete
  45. Good for you, Lee! Kick failure right in the butt. I believe in you.

    Btw, your covers are fabulous. Do you design them yourself? They're beautiful.

    ReplyDelete

Please say something to me, anything. Well, not anything, but a kind word will do.