Friday, July 29, 2016

Cherished Blogfest



Gram's Teapot, My Cherished Item

Her name was Lillian Francis Murray. Born in 1894, she grew up in Kansas, but spent her summers in Kentucky on her grandfather’s horse-breeding plantation. She was an excellent horsewoman, she baked cakes (no boxes involved) that rose higher than anyone else’s. Her quilt stitches were perfect. If she mended anything, you couldn’t tell there had been a crack or, in the case of clothes, a hole before she took a needle to the fabric. She was a “Waste Not Want Not” thinker, and she scrubbed everything to a shine--including one always slightly scruffy girl-child. I can still hear her say, “Cleanliness is next to Godliness.” 

I knew her as Mom. She was the person who picked me up when I cried, or who I ran to with a skinned knee. Oh, I had my mother, too. I was the only kid in the neighborhood with two moms. One went to work every morning. The other one stayed home with me. 

She taught me how to cook. She taught me how to sew. Mostly she taught me never to even think about shirking work unless it was Sunday. On that day, she’d sit in the living room and listen to my grandfather play his violin, we’d have a light “supper” and then maybe go to a movie, or friends would come over to play cards and talk. On the summer Sundays, she’d send me with my wagon to pick up ice at the corner market, and then I’d gather the neighbor kids to churn homemade ice cream. Grandpa would always take the last part of the churning duty because none of us had the muscle to crank it when it was nearly frozen.

She didn’t own a lot of things that were only for decoration. I remember everything having a useful purpose. And this teapot had a very useful purpose. It came into our home before I can remember. It was always either in the hutch next to the kitchen table and ready for use or on the table itself and filled with sweet-smelling tea. 

I’ve accumulated many valuables over time. This teapot is probably the least valuable in terms of money, but if there’s a fire, my grandmother’s teapot will go with me before any of the other things. It represents her and brings her voice to me just as I heard it in the days I was at her side.

Thanks for the Cherished Blogfest and a chance to visit my gram again. I even made tea in her pot today, so I could extend my visit with her.

35 comments:

  1. What wonderful memories. Yes, I can see how that would be the first thing you grabbed. Thank you for sharing.

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  2. It does hold great value - her memories.

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  3. That is a beautiful memory, which makes the tea pot priceless I know.
    Juneta @ Writer's Gambit

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  4. Holds the best value of all for you indeed. Owning only things with a purpose isn't a bad way to be either.

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  5. I had a grandmother similar to yours. I have a few things that were hers, and they are truly special. The teapot is beautiful but I'm sure that your memories of the time you spent with her are some of your most cherished. People like your Gram taught us by everyday example, how to be better people.

    Thanks you for joining us and for sharing your story and her teapot. Dan - cohost - #CBF16

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  6. Wonderful woman. This makes me wish I had kept my childhood tea pot. I remember it clearly from my New York days.

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  7. I really like the idea of practical things that are also beautiful, like your grandmother's teapot. Cheers - Ellen

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  8. Such a beautiful memory item. A wonderful story. Thank you.

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  9. Such a beautiful memory item. A wonderful story. Thank you.

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  10. As John says, it is a beautiful story of a wonderful person. Sadly, I lost all of my precious items in my house fire as I dragged my dog out of the fire. Living things over inanimate ones. But he still died. :-(

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  11. What a sweet memory. I have a teapot that was passed through my father's side. It's over 120 years old and came from China.

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  12. A priceless teapot that holds more than tea. Such a wonderful tribute to your grandmother.

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  13. A lovely, lovely story. Your relationship with your grandmother is precious. My grandmother gave me a silver dollar one year for Christmas. The only time I remember my grandparents giving us gifts. They had too many grandkids and not enough money. I still have that silver dollar. Memories are priceless.

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  14. Aw, what a touching post! Not surprised at all you cherish that teapot so much. The memories tied to it definitely make it priceless!

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  15. Such a delightful and visualy enticing story.

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  16. This is one of my favourite entries in the blogfest so far. Your mom sounds like a wonderful lady and that's such a sweet looking teapot. I admired the teapot of a great aunt for many, many years, and after she passed away, I was blessed enough to get it. Hmm... you may have just helped me select my object for NEXT year's Cherished Blogfest!

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  17. I'm thinking you and I were in the 'lucky' line when we were awarded grandmas. :-)

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  18. What a great item to have and hold all those memories in. I have nothing from my grandparents and many times wish that I did.

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  19. My eyes are sweating.
    Thank you. And her.

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  20. What a wonderful heartfelt memory and to have this teapot must bring so many memories and feelings alive. You are lucky to have had 2 moms who loved you dearly.

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  21. How blessed to have two mums. I want to be a grandma just like her! Love that teapot!

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  22. Hi Lee - how lovely to have your (now) teapot ... and what great stories the teapot will have had ... it sounds like your 'Mom' and your mother gave you a most blissful childhood ... happy memories to you - cheers Hilary

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  23. This was an excellent story Lee, it was a privillege to read it. Thanks.
    Yvonne.

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  24. What a great way to put forward your story. A really nice post to say what’s close to your heart. As a co-host, I thank you for being the part of the Cherished Blogfest and I hope you’re having a great time meeting new and existing blog friends.

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  25. That's a beautiful post full of so much warmth. My sister and I lived with our grandparents and I always think we were very fortunate. Somedays I feel sorry that our kids do not have that kind of a bond of shared memories.

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  26. Those simple, everyday items that remind us of loved ones now gone are special beyond words. The memories it conjures up are truly precious. Not surprising you cherish this teapot like you did your grandmother.

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  27. Seems like most things in this blogfest have a history. That's the only reason to cherish something, right?

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  28. This made me start to cry. Such a beautiful post. I love that you have the teapot and that the value come from more than meets the eye. :)
    ~Jess

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  29. A beautiful story to go with such a cherished object. Your grams sounds like she was quite a woman. Thanks for sharing.

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  30. Such a beautiful sentiment! Your grandma lives on. ☺ Monetary value is so inconsequential by comparison.

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  31. Funny how something as simple as a teapot can become so infused with meaning and memory, and all because of one special person. Thanks for sharing this cherished object and telling us about Mom. A really nice post.

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  32. Beautiful, glad you had a cup of tea in it, we should do these things more often, instead of using the tea bag, two totally different tastes in a cup of tea.
    Thanks for sharing, it's a lucky teapot, full of memories.

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  33. Lovely story. It calls for a pot of tea!

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  34. Hey Lee,

    Such wondrous, cherished memories. Nicely done and time for tea!

    As ever, your starstruckest human fan,

    Gary

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  35. Wow. That was beautiful. Thanks for giving us the chance to visit your grandmother with you. :)


    Alexa
    thessalexa.blogspot.com
    verbosityreviews.com

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