Friday, April 24, 2015

AtoZBlogChallenge:U is for Unique British Colonial Influence in Burma




It only takes a minute to visit more AtoZers on the Linky.

My theme this year is Burma AKA Myanmar. I used to live in Laos, so I looked forward to returning to Southeast Asia. I spent a little over three weeks exploring this country, learning a bit about its culture: its history, religion, and language. I thought others might enjoy some of what I learned and see some of what I saw.
Mandalay has so many 19th century British Buildings 
Pyinoolwin was a British summer retreat. Many Colonial Houses still stand. It was cool mountain area.
Answers to what do you know about tea in Burma?


T 1. When ordering tea, you should know what kind you want:sweet, strong, sweet and strong. There are many different combinations. (Think Starbucks and all the possible coffees you can order. It's about the same for tea in Burma: cho seh, bone mahn, baw hseent, jah hseent, pancho. It takes time to figure out which on suits your taste.)

F 2. You can order tea by the cup or bowl. (Actually you order it by the cup or "tankie," the Burmese adaptation of the word tank. It's not as big as a tank, but it's bigger than a cup.)

NOW what do you know about British Colonial Times in Burma?

T/F 1. Britain went to war with Burma in the early 1900's.

T/F 2. The Anglo-Burmese War had a few causes, but the most commonly named are the British desire for access to teak forests in southern Burma and a port to ship from. 




Answers tomorrow.

38 comments:

  1. I'm sure it's an odd mix of their architecture and the British.

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  2. Hi Lee - I'd love to see Mandalay .. one day perhaps. I guess both of those are right ... but it might have been 1920s- 30s .. cheers Hilary

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  3. So saying I just want a plain old cup of hot tea wouldn't get me anywhere?

    I'd be in trouble.

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  4. That's a neat looking house. :)

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  5. I think it would be fascinating to see those houses and the culture mixed together. :) I would love to order sweet tea, please. :)

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  6. I love your theme, too. Those are some lovely pictures. :)

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  7. That's a lot of tea choices! It would take me forever to figure out which kind I'd want.

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  8. Oh, that sounds like fun! I want taste all those tea types.

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  9. I forget how heavily the Brits have influenced other countries. Beautiful pics:)

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  10. Those buildings are so beautiful!

    The British were everywhere. I found their influence quite strange in Africa. There we were, watching rhinos go by, and eating full British breakfasts. It was a little bizarre.

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  11. Dang, so cool that you got live in such interesting palces:)

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  12. I would say 1F 2T. I think it was earlier. Another of those "not vety proud to be British" moments.
    Anabel's Travel Blog
    Adventures of a retired librarian

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  13. Another lovely travel without moving from my chair.
    Wonderful post Lee. both to read and look at the pictures.
    Yvonne,

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  14. Those Brits! "The sun never set..." I've heard Macau has some really beautiful architecture too. That's one thing we don't really have in Hawaii, those big stone buildings. Not a lot of natural stone to quarry. I am drawing a blank for Oahu trying to think about whether there was a lot of colonial architecture. Not so much I think, though there are a few older stone buildings. Now you've got me thinking!
    Maui Jungalow

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  15. Beautiful building and I love colonial homes.
    I can't answer the questions. Next to math, history is my worst subject. :)

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  16. I could drink a 'tank' of tea. Think both questions are true today.

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  17. Lovely theme and photos. Nice weekend!

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  18. Beautiful English homes... but so out of place! It would be just like the English to go to war over teak.

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  19. Makes sense there would still be a British influence there.

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  20. I know absolutely nothing about that but I love that you can still visit these historic places.

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  21. I don't drink tea, but your post makes me want to try it in Burma!! :)
    There is something inherently civilized about drinking tea that I envy ... too bad the drink just doesn't work for me.

    Your About page has to be the BEST I've ever read!! ... especially when you got to New Hampshire. It made me laugh :D No, I don't live in New Hampshire.

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  22. 1 = F

    2: there were 3 Anglo-Burmese wars in the 19th century. 1st was in response to a Burmese invasion into India to fight Arakanese patriots. 2nd was essentially because a hothead British Commodore seized one the Burmese King's ships & blockaded the Port of Rangoon. (England did capture ports & occupied the teak forests.) 3rd war came after Burma suggested a treaty w/ France & fined the Bombay Burma Trading Co for under reporting the amount of teak extracted.

    So, I'd hazard that #2 = True.

    This is a neat blog. Lots of new avenues for learning.

    Visiting from A to Z,

    Drusilla Barron
    http://lovedasif.com
    http://glamofgod.com

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  23. funny how it's about Brits it is called a colony, but when it is some other country it is called invasion, aggression.....

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  24. Those buildings are so beautiful.

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  25. The Brits were everywhere back then. They left their mark! I am glad the buildings still survive because so many are beautiful. Now for the questions which I often get 50% right:) I know there were wars but I think #1 is a trick question because I think they went to war in the 1800's but I can cay #2 is True-Wood was highly valued and so was a port...still is

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  26. That was interesting to know. Tea in a bowl/tankie. Being a tea lover, I think I don't mind that. I'd take sweet tea in a tankie, any day. Lovely pics too.
    *Shantala @ ShanayaTales*

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  27. Hey human, Lee!

    That's quite the British colonial influence. We were contemplating sorting out one of major colonies where they often say, "Have a nice day!"

    Time for tea, which, rather surprisingly, can be a meal.

    Pawsitive wishes,

    Penny!

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  28. Oh my, I have to comeback tomorrow for the answers!
    Evalina, This and that...

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  29. We have a building in Heliopolis in Cairo that looks exactly like the Mandalay building, except ours is white. I guess Egypt has a a lot of Unique British Colonial Influences too! You've done a fantastic job with the Burma adventures and your Muffin Commandos are awesome! Have a lovely weekend, Lee! :)

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  30. So lovely! I'm loving this tour of Burma with you! Lisa, co-host A to Z Challenge 2015 and http://www.lisabuiecollard.com

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  31. Nice buildings but it's true we were a bit of a bully boy in a lot of places so I'll go true on the questions.

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  32. It's fun to see how cultures crossover.

    You can find me here:
    ClarabelleRant

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  33. British Colonial influence extends far and wide... that colonial house is beautiful.
    When I saw the word Mandalay, I thought of the Kipling poem.

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