Friday, April 10, 2015

AtoZBlogChallenge:I is for Irrawaddy


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My theme this year is Burma AKA Myanmar. I used to live in Laos, so this was a return to Southeast Asia that I looked forward to. I spent a little over three weeks exploring this country, learning a bit about its culture: its history, religion, and language. I thought others might enjoy some of what I learned and see some of what I saw.

The poem Mandalay was written by Rudyard Kipling in 1890. The road he refers to in one line was really the Irrawaddy River. It hummed with trade from Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, Burma and India. In WWII the government sank many of the old British cargo ships that still were on the river to keep them out of the hands of the Japanese. Now Burma's bringing those ship up from the river bottom and restoring them. 




Leaving Mandalay

The Muddy Irrawaddy

Arriving at Mingun
Answers to H: What do you know about the horse carriages of Burma?

F 1. Hackney Carriages have been subject to government licensing at least as far back as 1950. (I found laws regulating them as far back as 1812, under what was titled The Burma Code.)

F 2. Hackney-carriage means small vehicle in Burma. (Hackney refers to the type of light-stepping horse used to draw the carriage.)

NOW what do you know about the Irrawaddy River?

T/F 1. The Irrawaddy is the largest river in the world.

T/F 2. The river has been used as a main trade route since the sixth century.
Answers tomorrow. 

34 comments:

  1. Restoring the sunken ships - that's cool.

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  2. Interesting -- your posts are very unique this year, Lee!

    Yvonne

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  3. So cool about the ships. Your pictures always tell such a great story on their own

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  4. Awesome pictures and interesting to read. Very enjoyable.
    Yvonne.

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  5. That's very cool that they're restoring the ships.

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  6. That middle picture looking out over the water is amazing. It almost looks like sandbanks.
    Tasha
    Tasha's Thinkings | Wittegen Press | FB3X (AC)

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  7. I think it's neat that they are bringing those ship back up and restoring them.

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  8. By largest river, do you mean widest? Or the most water discharged? Or the longest? I think it's wonderful that the British ships are being restored.

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  9. How fascinating that they are bringing the ships up. I always find that so cool!
    I can't even begin to guess how to pronounce this I word LOL.

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  10. This was a good post. Restoring those old ships must be awesome. Wish I could see some.

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  11. That's a really cool idea! I'd love to see the ships as they're being restored.

    Have a great weekend!

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  12. First time I got them both right. I don't think it's the largest river but I think the second one is true.

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  13. I like anything when it comes to restoring old stuff.

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  14. That river definitely played an important role in WWII. And now the ships are being restored? That's great!

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  15. I can imagine the rich trade and exchange that went on along the river... And beautiful pictures!

    @TarkabarkaHolgy from
    Multicolored Diary - Epics from A to Z
    MopDog - 26 Ways to Die in Medieval Hungary

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  16. I really enjoy looking at your pictures! Even the muddy river picture looks inviting!
    TheCyborgMom

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  17. We're almost through week 2! We all deserve a pat on the back. Thanks for keeping up with my posts. I appreciate all of your comments and all of your visits!

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  18. I've always preferred Menam :)

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  19. Gorgeous pics! Yeah, even the muddy river looks inviting.

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  20. Great pictures! That is a muddy river! :)
    ~Jess

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  21. Love the photos. That is one muddy river.

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  22. Hey Lee!

    I, I, I, what's been happening? You wouldn't be doing that alphabet challenge? Next thing you know, a bunch of alphabet crazy bloggers will be saying how relieved they are to be getting close to the halfway point. Note the irony.

    You used to live in Laos. Nice one. I reckon you had to leave because your starstruck fans just wouldn't give you a moment's peace.

    Great post. Great river. Thanks for sharing. Following!

    "I" is for "Irritable Blog Syndrome!"

    Although my absence might have been noted, rest assured, I'm still your starstuckest fan!

    Gary, whoever he is....

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  23. Well, I am consistent! I am getting all these wrong but I am learning:) In typical fashion I might be getting a D...probably an F:) Love the pictures-it looks so romantic like from a movie. Bringing these ships up is cool but must cost a fair bit. Now I will say False to the first question and true to the second:)

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  24. They're restoring the ships? Wow, how cool!

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  25. Didn't know those factoids about the rive and those are lovely pictures.

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  26. That must take a lot of work to get the ships up and restore them.

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  27. Really lovely photos and interesting tidbits :)
    Visiting for the A-Z Challenge -- so rare to find a blogger who's actually participating! *delighted*

    http://jolenemottern.com/

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  28. That is one really long river. It's kinda brown though and I don't think it's as long as the Nile, so I'll keep mine. I love the name "Mandalay." There's something very musical and romantic about it. You have a bunch of commenters. I don't know how A-Zers do it. I can barely handle visiting everyone on Celebrate the Small Things once a week. :P

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  29. The ships look like they would just cause quite the traffic near the docks!

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  30. I'm sure the ships will have a lot of interesting artefacts to find. Isn't the Nile the longest/largest river? Sure 2 is true though.

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  31. While I was reading your post I assumed you were going to say they were pulling them up to scrap them, but it's a much larger undertaking to restore them. They must have some important plans for them!

    You can find me here:
    ClarabelleRant

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  32. Hi Lee - I love the name Irrawaddy .. and Kipling wrote some amazing poems. I sincerely hope they do restore some of those special river boats ...

    The Irrawaddy is not the longest river ... but I'm sure it's been a main trade route for centuries and centuries ... the only way to travel sometimes ..

    Cheers - fascinating to see these ... Hilary

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