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Friday, October 3, 2014

Evernight Teen Celebrates Four Years

EVERNIGHT TEEN 

Join authors, bloggers and reviewers as we take a RED CARPET tour featuring Evernight's smart and sexy books (Mine is not in the sexy category. Just FYI). Slip on your virtual stilettos and walk the red carpet of award winning titles, spectacular reviews, and paparazzi style interviews.

Prizes Galore



Answer *MY QUESTION in the comment section for a chance to win (be sure to include your email address and format you need for eBook):

* Your choice of an Amazon Kindle Fire HD or Kobo Arc 7
* $100 Amazon GC
* $50 Evernight GC
* My blog prize: 5 eBooks and 2 signed paperbacks--US only, I'm afraid. :-(

Be sure to visit every stop on the tour where you can enter for a chance to win one of the great prizes. 





ET authors are taking time out to give their own books a SHOUT OUT and a little HORN BLOWING. Today we're getting a bit of the Red Carpet treatment. Now I turn the spotlight on my book. 


 I'm short of red carpets at the moment, but I did dig up a red sheet. Shhhhh! Don't tell. 

I didn't expect to write a Young Adult novel about a boy who can barely read, but it happened. And here's how. I was lost inside a story and enjoying that wonderful feeling of 

1) not having written it myself  
2) loving the voice and excitement. 

That's when it hit me. Boink!


What if I couldn't read?

So that was the beginning of Double Negative--a book that turned me into a LITERACY advocate. Some of you joined me my @WeWrite4U_Lit Twitter campaign in September, so you know I'm serious. If I write books, I need readers, lots of readers, and millions of people in the U.S. can't read what I write. They can't even read food labels. 

Some Reviews:

Double Negative has done well in the review department. Here's what two reviewers wrote. I chose two I don't know. That only seems fair.

From AMAZON
Carla Davis, PA: I decided to give Double Negative a try because the sample dragged me in from the first paragraph until I had to read the whole thing! It's so rare to see well done first person, but this book does it masterfully. Hutch has a real voice that must be rendered in the way the author has chosen. No lazy writing here! The characters are well-rounded and leap off of the page into your imagination. While the book has some deeply emotional moments and deals with themes and issues that could fall into oversentimentality or preachiness, the text never crosses the line. (A real feat as one of the main characters is a priest) There are real failures and victories, and Hutch's voice carries you on through all of them in vivid prose. I was rooting for our hero and his friends for the entire book. In short, this is an excellent read for teens and adults alike, and it kept me up an hour and a half after my bedtime, so kudos to the author! Highly recommended!

From GOODREADS
Mpetbot:  Once again, C Lee McKenzie spins a tale of young adults presented with problems typical of their age — bullies, lack of self-confidence -- and not so typical -- dyslexia, eating disorders, and absent parents. She guides Hutch, Nyla, Wang, and Meeker to solve their problems, using their challenges as learning opportunities. 

Congratulations to C Lee McKenzie for another novel where negative themes give way to positive themes -- this time, of giving gratitude and letting go of hate.

******

I won't please everyone. If I did, the book would be too middle of the road, blah! Some people won't like the drugs. Some won't like the poor grammar my kids use. Some won't like my use of the name, Fat Nyla. Some won't like mixing the story of an old woman with an incurable disease in a YA. I'm waiting for one of those reviews to come in. In the meantime, I'm glad I wrote this story, and I hope it reaches the kids I want it to reach.

*MY QUESTION: What would you miss most if you couldn't read?

50 comments:

  1. I'd miss being able to drive, as I'd no longer be able to read road signs!
    I'd also miss writing. I guess I could listen to books on tape, but not the same as actual reading, either.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I always think of writing as the other side of reading.

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  2. I would miss everything. Not only it helps you in life but I miss all fun you get out of reading a really good book
    dennisntabitha28@yahoo.com

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  3. Good question what I would miss most is not really understanding anything that I see. What if I was allergic to a certain type of food and couldn't read it on the label. I would also miss not being able to escape reality even if its for only a short while. lavidabrisco(at)yahoo(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is a real danger among the low literate and illiterate population.

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  4. i would miss being able to learn new things. i so love being able to learn something new every day

    parisfan_ca@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That would be more than hard for me, too.

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  5. Ooh interesting question. I would probably miss the characters the most.

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  6. Oh, I'd miss so, so much! I'd really miss reading all the wonderful stories my daughter writes.

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  7. I think I would miss to learn. I am mostly autodidact. I don't think I could live without reading. The need would make me learn somehow.
    Dragon Hugs!

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    Replies
    1. So you are one of thos fortunate dragons with a thirst for knowledge!

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  8. I would miss all the worlds I was able to visit, along with its people and the experience of just being lost in a book. And I agree that you can't please everybody. I think people have different expectations when it comes to books they read and writing realistic fiction is supposed to shine a light on some of those ugly truths, which may not be everyone's cup of tea.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Being lost in a book is one of my favorite life experiences.

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  9. In general, I'd miss the ability to soak up knowledge through my eyes. In relation to books, I'd miss the escape, the escape from my own reality; the journey authors invite me to join in on; the characters that become a part of my life for a brief period.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Reading is definitely the key to a large world. Thanks for the comment.

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  10. Everything. I can't imagine not being able to read.

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  11. oh, my, why do you have a red sheet in your house? :))

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  12. You tackled all those different issues so effortlessly in Double Negative - all through the view of someone who couldn't read. Those reviews are awesome and deserved! :)

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  13. I wouldn't know how to follow directions to cook my food. Good thing a lot of packages have pictures to help. I couldn't read a map or road signs, I'd get lost. Most of all I wouldn't be able to get absorbed in a good book.

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  14. I don't have to imagine. In Egypt, I speak the language like a 5-yr-old and I'm completely illiterate... My concern is far outweighed by my apathy.

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  15. I love this tour! The Evernight Teen books have such awesome covers. I think what I'd miss most is just being able to jump into a story. I suppose I could listento audiobooks, but it isn't the same experience.

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  16. Not being able to read severely hampers living. You cannot enjoy stories, fill out job applications, travel with confidence for a few. Pretty much everything depends on reading in some way.

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  17. This is great about your book and you pick on something that, I believe, the education committee or whatever they are called, do not want it to be known...namely that many kids are unable to read. In this day and age of short forms due to texting and twitter plus kids only to receive positive reinforcement so pass them when they should fail plus North America's warped obsession with sports, they pass kids through the system. Ok forgive me with that long sentence, anyhoo, you touch on something that needs to be addressed. If I couldn't read, I would lose a bit of my soul.

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  18. I'd miss being able to get lost in a book and the wonderful feeling you get when you read the last page of a book. Also talking and about books which I love to do.

    ShirleyAnn(at)speakman40(dot)freeserve(dot)co(dot)uk

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  19. I'd miss the adventures and the expansion of my world. To not read - yes, that would be difficult. Sounds like a fun hop. Will have to try and check out the other posts. Happy weekend!

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  20. I can remember not being able to read. I was a slow learner and it really, really stunk. I was so happy when I finally learned, I'd read everything I could get my hands on.

    Congrats to Evernite!!

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  21. What would I miss most if I couldn't read? Hmm... well, I'd have to rely on Hollywood adaptations of stories, missing out on the in-depth experience. Oh! And I wouldn't be able to read your blog posts. :O

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  22. Wow, tough question. I read about 6 books a week, so it feels almost impossible to answer that. I believe I would miss my favorite hobby, my passion, a world of knowledge and fantasy. Thanks for the giveaway.
    morebooksthanlivros@gmail.com I got a kindle so it would be mobi or prc or pdf.

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  23. That is a tough question, I would miss the chance to learn something new each day that I get from reading.
    skpetal at hotmail dot com

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  24. Always having something to keep me entertained.

    acm05atjuno.com

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  25. Stories and reading in general. I'm not a big fan of audiobooks, plus I am a fast reader, and audiobooks are too slow for me. I love reading, it's my favorite and longest hobby, so I would miss reading in general.

    tiger-chick-1(at)hotmail(dot)com

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  26. It's hard to imagine; I think I'd feel half-blind if I weren't able to read. I'm trying to envision it, but I just can't. It's a nightmare scenario.

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  27. In one word EVERYTHING. I have been reading since I was 3. I discovered long lost kingdoms, fairytale lands, undersea worlds, different countries, happily ever after and love. I can't imagine not reading. It's my favorite thing to do. I would rather read than go to a party. When I read I am transported to that place and time. I would miss EVERYTHING.

    kyratinker36@gmail.com

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  28. I don't want to imagine a world where I couldn't read. It's my escape and it's so precious to me. prettylittlepages[at]gmail[dot]com

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  29. I would've missed reading stories to my kids, helping them with their homework, etc.
    Mobi(kindle copy)
    tweetyiniowa@yahoo.com

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  30. If I could not read I think I'd miss most the magic of stories, expanding my small world, visiting countries I'll never see in real life, learning the history of our world, meeting characters that I love, or hate. Just the whole reading experience.

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  31. Not being able to read would be a horrible. It means not only would I never have met any of my favorite literary characters, but every part of my life would be affected. I know that millions of people can't read, but I can't begin to fathom how they cope.
    Kathryn Merkel
    @drainbamagedgyz
    drainbamaged.gyzmo at gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  32. I'd miss all the incredible stories that everyone tells! They help me get through my day most of the time! <3

    Thanks for the giveaway! =)

    Take care & I hope you have a great day! =)
    Brandi
    BLeigh1130 at yahoo dot com

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  33. I think what I would miss most if I couldn't read, knowing what I know since I can, is the absolute total escape that your mind can get while reading. The different characters and worlds you can travel to and when you need to, set down the book (though often times reluctantly) and rejoin the really real world knowing you can return to the pages at any time. I also would miss the fact that with reading, a story never really ends so you can always go back to the imaginary or always get to that happily ever after if you'd like whenever you want to. I guess to simplify, I'd miss the escape and the worlds that reading opens up :D

    That was such a fun question! Thanks for that! Have a terrific day one and all!

    Shelly H
    booski24@hotmail.com

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  34. I can't imagine not being able to read. I would miss everything that is me. But, like the first commenter said, I would really miss driving.
    lkish77123 at gmail dot com

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  35. If I couldn't read I would miss contact most of all. Many of my friends and family are scattered across the US and we mostly stay in touch by writing (IM, Skype, FB, etc.). marie.mattingly88@yahoo.com (Prefer: Kindle format)

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  36. I really can't imagine not reading--my first memories are of being read to, and of reading myself. I'd probably miss the hundreds upon hundreds of dollars I would have to spend on audiobooks!!

    Thanks for the amazing giveaway!
    elizabeth @ bookattict . com
    GFC & Linky: BookAttict

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  37. Congrats on all of your success! Thank you for the fantastic hop! Im not sure what id do if i couldnt read. Id be so lost! I love escaping into story, living through characters. Id definitely spend a fortune in audiobooks! lol
    Mobi please if i win. Thank you!
    shadowluvs2read(at)gmail(dot)com

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  38. I'd miss all those new worlds and the people who populate them with all their trials, tribulations and love

    leetee2007@hotmail.com

    mobi

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  39. What would you miss most if you couldn't read? (Is there even an answer for this?)
    OMG...EVERYTHING! All those incredible stories I've read over the years??!!
    Reading is knowledge. Knowledge is power. Readers are leaders!
    mish(at)writer-in-transit(dot)co(dot)za

    ReplyDelete

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