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Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Pros Part 7, The Pros Give Us Some Advice, Featuring Brinda Berry & @WeWrite4U

For those who are new to me, I've  featured some writer friends who have some excellent books out this year. I asked them to send me their latest book, their tagline or log line and a short piece of advice they wanted to pass on to writers, especially those still seeking publication. Last week JENN HUBBARD with her book, UNTIL IT HURTS TO STOP. Today I have Brinda Berry of UNCOMMONYA joining us. Take it away, Brinda.



Brinda's Book Available at AMAZON, B and N, KOBO, APPLE ITUNES
Logline: Tales of myth and legend retold. A collection of six folklore retellings that will twist your mind and claim your heart.

Best advice: Never underestimate your audience. YA readers want to be challenged by rich plots, genuine emotion, and multidimensional characters.

Brinda Berry
Adventures with Adrenaline-Addled Attraction
WEB     BLOG     FACEBOOK    TWITTER   GOODREADS    YOUTUBE



*****

In keeping with Brinda's advice, one thing that seems to still surprise readers is that what is categorized as young adult, intrigues older readers. That's because, even though the MC is usually a teen, the plot, the characters and the themes are not limited to reach a stereotyped teen profile. Here's what one reviewer--THEBOOKSAGE--said about some YA books he read. One is mine. I blush! But not much, not anymore.

"I have a confession to make.  I am NOT a 16-year old girl.  And, yet, I absolutely loved C. Lee McKenzie's The Princess of Las Pulgas, which IS about a 16-year old girl.  I have read and enjoyed several YA books in the past that had teenage female protagonists - Truly, Madly, Deadly by Hannah Jayne and Wyndano's Cloak by A.R. Silverberry (his was a fantasy to boot) come to mind.  So I'm not a novice when it comes to YA's.  You can add [McKenzie's] to my recommend list.  It's absolutely terrific." The Book Sage

******


Now here's a little drum roll.  

Below (if Blogger hasn't sabotaged me) is a Linky. This is NOT a HOP, so you can relax, Gary, and you can sign up, too. September is National Literacy Month, and I hope that you'll join me in supporting LITERACY. Here's how.

1. Let me know you're interested by signing up on the Linky. Then, please get the code and post the Linky on your own blog if you can. If you don't want to add the Linky to your blog, put up a link to THE WRITE GAME, so others can sign up. I'll keep the Linky on my blog until the last week in September.

2. Below are some pre-written Tweets and I'm hoping we can TWEET UP A STORM with Tweets and RT's the month of September. I'll be posting more pre-written Tweets during the month to keep them fresh.

3. I've created a LIST/GROUP for Twitter @WeWrite4U_Lit, so please join and use the group's handle in your Tweets.

4. I've followed and been followed by these literacy groups. You might want to add some of them or find some local to you.

@supportliteracy 
@LitPartners 
@literature_dp
@literacycoop
@HouLit


12 PREPARED TWEETS ( in parentheses I’ve put the source just in case you need it) Hope you'll create some of your own, too.

30 min of reading to a child each week=literacy & love of reading

Don’t give kids a sucker. Give them a book. Make reading valuable

Learn to read. Read to learn.

Get books into homes. Create readers.

Children who can’t read can’t contribute to society.

Read aloud to your kids. Make it dramatic. Make it fun. Create readers.

32 million adults in the U.S. couldn’t read  2013 (FYI citation: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/06/illiteracy-rate_n_3880355.html)
academic failure and delinquency, violence, and crime is welded to reading failure (FYI citation: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/06/illiteracy-rate_n_3880355.html)
$225 billion or more each year in non-productivity in the workforce (FYI citation: http://www.literacypartners.org/literacy-in-america/impact-of-illiteracy)

over 2 million New York City residents are functionally illiterate That’s 25% (FYI citation: http://www.literacypartners.org/literacy-in-america)

This is the first year I've tried to organize this, but I'm hoping to make this an annual event, improving it as I learn what works and what doesn't. Any suggestions? Leave them in your comment. Thanks.


****** 
My quote for the day: "Another belief of mine: that everyone else is an adult, whereas, I am merely in disguise." One of my favorite authors, Margaret Atwood

No questions today. You're on your own.

43 comments:

  1. I know Brinda!
    Cool TheBookSage said he really enjoyed your book.
    Be glad to help with Literacy Month.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love Brinda's advice. It's true that YA readers want much of their stories and that is part of the thrill of writing stories, developing those plots, twists and turns to delight the reader.

    And I'm an adult who also loves reading YA. Heck, I even enjoy MG stories :-)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Love the advice! I've classified my WIP as YA because the main character is 15, but it's definitely got some adult moments.

    I'd love to help out with Literacy Month.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Good advice, and what a beautiful cover for LORE!

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  5. Your idea for supporting literacy month sounds great. Wish I could help but I've got to survive being swim captain mom and my mother is visiting in September.

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  6. Brinda's advice is good. A well-written YA book can appeal to adults, too.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Awesome. I think I could tweet along. =)

    I think YA is the most challenging spot to write, but the funnest at the same time. You still get to be creative, but you really do have to build everything adults demand into the story.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I can help with Tweets and promoting it next month.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Beautiful cover!

    I'm not sure what the linky is for. And, for me, it's broken.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Ok,that is a spectacular cover, and I LOVE retellings of myths, folklore, and fairy tales! I'm not 16, either, but I want to read it.

    I'll help with Tweets! I have to remember somehow, though. What a good cause.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'll come over and knock on your door in the mornings!

      Delete
  11. I signed up. I don't know how much of this I'll do because I'm going to be busy promoting my new book. But I'll try to stick in a plug and a tweet whenever I can.

    I'm going to link back to you because I'm going too busy to watch a linky on the Tiki Hut.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's fine. Let's see what kind of a stir we can cause.

      Delete
  12. Thanks for having me here today. I have a heart for literacy. I worked for many years as a coordinator for a local literacy council and tutored students with reading difficulties. What a worthwhile project to support!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're wonderful, Brinda. Great to have you here today.

      Delete
  13. Literacy is an excellent cause, and great advice from Brinda!

    ReplyDelete
  14. It all comes down to audience. Good advice by Brinda. Will RT you on Twitter when I see it. October is uber, uber busy...

    ReplyDelete
  15. Great advice from Brinda (I thoroughly hate, as a reader, when a writer beats me over the head with the obvious...readers are smart! Respect them!)

    All signed up. What a great cause for writers to take on!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My thoughts exactly. If there's no one to read what we write, what's the point? :-)

      Delete
  16. Great advice from Brinda. It all comes down to audience for your book.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And so older writers have to 1) learn about their audience 2) dredge up those memories from their youth and use them. Maybe a combination.

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  17. Not underestimating your audience seems to be a theme in this series!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think you're right, Dianne. If we miss our audience, we don't succeed.

      Delete
  18. Excellent advice from Brinda! And what a wonderful compliment to YOU from that reviewer. That is so cool!

    I love a good story, despite the age of the main character. One of the most haunting stories I've read is The Boy in the Striped Pajamas. I think the protagonist is 10, but wow, what a story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Boy in the Striped Pajamas will never leave me. It should be required reading for everyone.

      Delete
  19. Great advice. I'm one of those adults who reads mostly YA books, not because I write them but because they're better than most adult books. :) An editor recently reminded me that the reader was smart and would get the point. I didn't have to keep repeating it. Ouch.

    Signed up.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know you're a YA book reader and a YA book writer with a lot of awards to show how well you do your job.

      Delete
  20. The cover for Lore is stunning! And I'm not a 16-year-old girl either, but I love YA. I actually read a ton of YA books this year and enjoyed them immensely. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. YA is not only for the 16-year-old reader. Thanks for adding to that, Chrys.

      Delete
  21. That is a gorgeous cover. I tend to lean toward older protagonists though. Literacy is a great cause!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Literacy is a writer's cause. That's for sure.

      Delete
  22. I read (and write) for girls who are even younger than teens, and there's something SO fun about it! It just takes me right back to childhood.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're doing a lot with that writing. Let's get as many girls to read them as possible.

      Delete
  23. Thanks for the great advice, Brinda! Congrats on the fabulous review from The Booksage, Lee! Promoting Literacy Month is a fantastic idea! I'll be happy to help spread the word, though I'm not on Twitter.

    Julie

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  24. Love that quote! Lore sounds great.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Thanks for the advice! And I signed up for the literacy effort. :)

    Yvonne

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You did more than that! You said, "Get that spamy egg image out of there." And then you found a logo to make this thing work. Thanks, YV.

      Delete

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